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10 Comments

  1. Sally Jane Smith
    6th November 2021 @ 11:15 am

    A great read – thanks!

    Reply

    • Beth Haslam
      6th November 2021 @ 12:03 pm

      You’re very welcome, Sally, many thanks for reading the blog. 🙂

      Reply

  2. Tricia
    6th November 2021 @ 11:57 am

    A great blog, Beth. I really enjoyed this.

    Reply

    • Beth Haslam
      6th November 2021 @ 12:03 pm

      Thanks, Tricia, I’m so glad you enjoyed the read. It’s a subject I could spend far too long on! 😀

      Reply

  3. Carolyn
    6th November 2021 @ 1:52 pm

    A phrase that has stuck in my mind since schooldays is “Il a les araignées au plafond” which I assume equates to “bats in the belfrey” for daft people.

    Reply

    • Beth Haslam
      6th November 2021 @ 2:12 pm

      ‘Spiders on the ceiling’? Yes, that makes perfect sense, Carolyn. Thank you, and now, of course, I’ll have to go and check it out! 😀

      Reply

  4. Kathryn Gauci
    7th November 2021 @ 12:41 am

    Great post, Beth. I must remember some of these sayings and try and use them, although my French is so bad, they wouldn’t have a clue what I was saying!

    Reply

    • Beth Haslam
      7th November 2021 @ 9:40 am

      Thank you, Kathryn. Heh heh heh, don’t worry, if you do come unstuck while using some I’m sure your French friends will applaud your efforts! 😀

      Reply

  5. Jemille R Williams
    7th November 2021 @ 8:00 am

    Thank you for Frenchsplaining these! Idioms are baffling all over the world.
    We had a French exchange student and I was charged with doing a lesson with him every day.
    He would ask me what “used to do” meant. I told him I had no idea, but just reiterated what it meant.

    Reply

    • Beth Haslam
      7th November 2021 @ 9:42 am

      You’re very welcome, Jemille, I had great fun with these. Idioms can be confusing, I understand exactly why you would respond in that way!

      Reply

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